A gripping but inadequate chronicle of the times: A review of Bob Woodward’s “Fear: Trump in the White House.”

I read Bob Woodward and Car Bernstein’s ‘All the Presidents Men’ some time back, as I have always been fascinated by the Nixon Presidency, with all its drama and dysfunction and ‘dark side of Camelot’ themes, as well as the tortured psychology of Nixon himself. Woodward has chronicled pretty much every President since, and has traced the effects of Watergate through successive Presidencies.
Trump, though, is a new low of dysfunction, a new standard of venality and dysfunction in the White House that makes Nixon look the soul of integrity. How does Woodward tackle him? he uses the ‘deep cover’ that has serviced him well in the past, speaking to senior officials off the record. And it does here make for gripping drama. the book is mainly reconstructed dialogue of various situations in the Trump Presidency as harvested from these interviews, with linking narrative and background there, but kept to a minimum.
It works well in conveying immediacy, drama, the white hot moments of critical events unfolding. Trump’s criminal stupidity is of Godzilla proportions, stomping on any good sense that gets in its way, as his beleaguered officials try to steer him, contain him, and snatch documents from his desk so that he can’t sign his own harmful directives.
That all said, I am left feeling that Bob Woodward used his usual playbook, which is very ‘Washington,’ always slightly dazzled by the culture of the Hill and the language and customs of power. And that play-book can’t do justice to the Trump Presidency. This is a Presidency that is tearing up all the norms of political and human decency. Woodward’s style is more suited to days when they were still ascendant, even when they were tarnished by Nixon. Woodward wrote well about that tarnishing. But here, I feel he needs a tougher approach.
Woodward pretty much buys into the idea that the GOP contains heroes trying to restrain Trump. But he ignores why more of them aren’t being more active in defying this President. It is one thing to whisper to a journalist in deep cover, or sneak a document off a desk. Another to really do something that counts, by taking a public stand. And why does Woodward dismiss Christopher Steele’s dossier on Russian Collusion as trash? This is an essential theme and he does not explain his view, or acknowledge its importance.
All in all this is a compulsive read, but inadequate to the times.

As a postscript, I tried to post this review on Amazon, but was blocked, as Amazon says “reviews are being limited because of unusual reviewing activity.”  Go figure.

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The Devil’s Bargain: A review of the book and audiobook of Luke Harding’s ‘Collusion’

Luke Harding’s journalism has given us a depressing but gripping take on one of the most blatant, brazen and frightening political twists of modern times: that Russia, based on it’s existing cod war, KGB and espionage infrastructure has launched cyber war on the West, and, Manchurian Candidate style, installed its own puppet in the Whitehouse. One that fit a template they had for such a candidate: vain, paranoid, ultra-wealthy, and with powerful connections, and the media presence and warped charisma to gull a large percentage of the American presence.
The book alternates between recent events of Trump’s candidacy and presidency, and the larger backstory of Russian politics and espionage. The characters range from the naïve and utterly stupid to the ruthless Machiavel. Guess which one is which. It’s not Trump with his hand rammed up the puppet’s hole and squeezing.
For the audiobook the Russian story can be at times confusing, those long Russian names crossing and criss-crossing can tax the short-term memory. But it is very much worth the effort.
Luke Harding writes with a ruthless objectivity, but he cannot hide his dismay and contempt for Trump his Presidency, those who have profited and helped bring it about, and the amoral ruthlessness of Putin. The narrator, Jonathan Amis, does a good job of switching between a clear, dry delivery and absolute incredulous disgust. The switch from one to the other is sometimes almost comical.
It’s the more intellectual sibling of Fire and Fury.
Read, and pray for the light to dawn.

The nightmare is real: A review of Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury

So you want measured scholarly analysis of the Trump Presidency? You want a sober, analytical dissection of this political phenomenon? Look elsewhere.
Because this is high octane “wait ’til you hear this” gossip, delivered by someone who corners you at the bar with a manic gleam in their eye, flushed with excitement. You try to catch someone else’s eye, to make your excuses and leave, but before you know it, you’re hooked.
This is larger than life (or in a sane world a would be) American grotesque. Like some kind of film where maniacs seize the White House, and you scoff at the implausibility, but snuggle down to a guilty pleasure, because the writer knows what he’s doing.
And I do think that at its core is truth. The direction of travel it tells is attested whenever we read a Trump tweet, or see him on the news. I’d love to dismiss the contents of this book as lurid tittle tattle. But that it is not wise. For the barbarians have breached the gates, and have their torches poised to burn down the city.
Michael Wolff tells a story that is a demonic retelling of the American dream. Donald Trump, surrounded by a crowd of sycophants, power brokers, machiavels and political mercenaries makes a bid for the Presidency. The book reveals that he would like to have lost, as does his wife, the beleaguered Melania. Most of the rest share the conviction that this candidacy is a doomed bid, but one that will bring victory in defeat: an enhanced brand of the wronged ‘man of the common people’ contender brought down by Crooked Hillary. Stocks will soar. Portfolios will go stellar. This sounds plausible. Just as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove looked horrified to have helped win Brexit, so the Trump team looked visibly stunned and aghast at their victory. Especially Melania. But once victorious, Trump convinces himself that maybe he is the best President ever, and his team resolve to salvage what they can, make the best of it, and rescue Trump from himself, variously.
So you’ll be familiar with a lot of this book’s revelations, which have been well reported. The diet cokes, cheeseburgers, two tv screens in the bedroom, manic rages, air of contempt in the staff, bloody infighting, treason, and more, is all there, told in dry and sardonic tones that occasionally break into open disgust.
There are insights in addition, less well reported, as to why, for example, Paul Ryan is so supine, and of some of the pressures, internal and external, that lead to Trump saying such breathtakingly stupid and beyond offensive things, the “good on both sides” when talking about death dealing fascists for example, and more, too much more.
Wolff also conveys the culpability of large sections of the media, that can’t break out of the hyper-speed news cycle, can’t dwell on anything long enough to let it breathe and cause the damage and concern it should do, before falling into Trump’s trap and speeding onto the next beyond belief stupidity.
Steve Bannon plays a big part in proceedings. Obviously Wolff’s principal source, the book paints a very vivid picture of him, and I think it does give him too much attention. The portrayal steers over too much into anti-hero or likeable rogue. No, he’s a grotesque, eviscerated by even Trump, not worthy of so much attention. He literally has the last word in the book, and shouldn’t.
That said, this is un-missable. Historians are going to have so much fun separating fact from fiction. Grab a copy, because events are moving fast.